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Vidalia   

In shelter Cat

Homer Glen, IL, 60491
Pet name:
Vidalia
Gender:
Female
Breeds:
Domestic Short Hair
Date:
04/12/2021
Colors:
Black & White / Tuxedo
Size:
Small
Age:
Baby
Description:
We truly believe there is a home for every cat, even one with special needs like 7 month old tailless Vidalia! We know we might have her for a long time waiting for the right person, but theyre out there somewhere.

Lets first talk about the good stuff! Vidalia is ridiculously adorable and tons of FUN! She has soooo much energy and is guaranteed to keep you entertained from sun up to sun down. Her crazy, silly antics will bring joy to a room. She loves to climb, jump, explore and PLAY with everything (cardboard boxes and catnip toys are her favorite). Vidalia also loves to play with people - and by "play", we mean attack your ankles while youre walking. Shes not doing it in a mean way, but she is just so darn hyper, she cant help herself. So if she gets a little nippy with you, its only because shes super excited and had never interacted with other cats before to know what kind of play is off limits. For this reason, she might not do well with younger children, but older kids should be fine. Vidalia is super social and is sure to greet you at the door when you come home, so shed excel in an active home or one with lots of visitors (so long as your visitors dont mind kitty nibbles when shes feeling frisky). Shes also super sweet once her energy is depleted. She purrs almost instantly upon receiving attention, and doesnt mind being picked up or carried for a short time. 

Now, on to some of her quirks. Well, we already talked about the biting. Which, again, is never done maliciously, but she can put her teeth on you a little harder than one would like. Experienced cat owners will likely be familiar with this type of behavior, but we want to be up front about that. (She may also lose her nibbly nature as she matures, or if she has enough playtime with toys). Additionally, she is not a huge fan of other cats. At first, we thought it would be impossible for her to cohabitate with another feline, but lately, weve been letting her interact in our foster cat room with others, and while she does vocalize (she is very growly with them), she has yet to act out aggressively towards anyone. In most cases, if the cats ignore her, she ignores them. We think she is "all bark, no bite" when shes voicing her displeasure for being in their presence. So ultimately, we think she could learn to live just fine with another cat or two. Also, Vidalia walks a bit crooked in her back end (no doubt from her being tailless), but it does not affect her mobility at all.

Lastly, lets talk about her special needs. As we already mentioned, Vidalia has no tail. While it makes her ridiculously cute, its very common for tailless cats to have "bathroom" issues due to the deformity that causes them to not have a tail in the first place. We are not sure if Vidalia was born this way (we think this is the case since her stub appears to be more of a "corkscrew") or had an injury at some point, but regardless, she has trouble controlling her bowels/bladder. This means that sometimes she goes in the litter box (actually, she attempts to use the box all the time, but most times, nothing actually comes out), but very often she just goes...whenever, wherever. Many times, she will start "pushing" while shes in the box and then hop out to run around her cage and then later, more stool will fall out of her rectum. Obviously, this is a big challenge to overcome for an adopter. However, there are many ways Vidalia can live a happy, fulfilling life with a loving family with just a little bit of effort. Currently, Vidalia spends her days in a cage and is let out under supervision. While this is not ideal, it is the easiest way to be able to clean up her messes one to two times a day, and then let her exercise when volunteers are present. Obviously in a home setting, there will be people around to monitor her more often, and she would be able to free roam for much longer periods than she is able to at the shelter. It would be a completely acceptable arrangement to have her caged (or put in a small, tiled, easy-to-clean room like a bathroom or laundry room) at night or when people are not at home, and then let her have the run of the house when she can be watched. Having her wear diapers is another option, though it sometimes takes a while for cats to get used to them and not pull them off (we have not tried them on her since she is caged a majority of the time). A third option is to pair her with someone who is either experienced or willing to learn how to express her bowel and bladder. This way, she can be emptied at regular times and you wont have to worry about unexpected accidents. Additionally, she is on Miralax daily (she gobbles it up in her wet food) to help her pass stool more easily, as she is more prone to getting constipated.

We know a cat that has improperly eliminations issues is a "hard sell", but this wonderful, active, playful girl has SO much life ahead of her and will definietly make a great companion to someone who is willing to put in the little bit of extra work she requires.

Location


  1. American Humane Association
  2. Peeva
  3. American Veterinary Medical Association
  4. Veterinary Information Network
 
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